BankNotes – June 2013

I believe that it is imperative that the public recognize the devastating consequences of Keynesian thinking that has dominated the economic world since the early twentieth century. Not to mention the monetarist thinking of Milton Friedman that has compounded the problem. Also understand that this thinking cannot continue indefinitely into the future. I believe that it is evident that history has demonstrated this truth. Unless the problem is understood there is not much chance of a solution.

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BankNotes – May 2013

Dr. Solomon Stephen Huebner was a distinguished professor of insurance at the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, and chairman of the Department of Insurance at the institution. He is responsible for having written the very first textbook on insurance in 1915 and introduced the first university-level insurance course in the United States. This earned him the accolade “the teacher who changed an industry.”

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BankNotes – April 2013

In both the Lara-Murphy Report and our book, How Privatized Banking Really Works, Carlos and I explain the benefits of Nelson Nash’s Infinite Banking Concept (IBC), which involves the disciplined use of dividend-paying life insurance policies. Since Nash himself couches the discussion in terms of whole life policies, we naturally did the same.

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BankNotes – March 2013

“This used to be a hell of a good country, I can’t understand what’s gone wrong with it.” said George Hanson in the movie “Easy Rider.” My old friend Joe Sobran (1946-2010) loved that line and quoted it often. Sobran, who worked alongside William Buckley at National Review during its heyday, was one of the smartest people I’ve ever known. After a lifetime of thinking about politics, he eventually decided that there was only one way out of our troubles: the whole of the government has to go.

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BankNotes – February 2013

A mentor of mine, Clarence Carson, published a book in the 70s titled, The War on the Poor. He took his title from Lyndon Johnson’s so called “war on poverty.” Carson noted that actual wars are waged against actual people rather than against circumstances. Thus, if the government were engaged in a war it must be against some identifiable group of people. In his book he identified the poor as that group by analyzing the economic impact of the various policies that Johnson pursued. In each new initiative of the Great Society the effect of those policies was to raise prices on various products and cause the poor in America to suffer for the sake of a few special interests.

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BankNotes – January 2013

I hope you had a joyous holiday season and that you are looking forward to “pushing back the frontiers of ignorance” in the new year. There is a tremendous task in front of us. The world needs to know the message of Infinite Banking Concepts. Demonstrating how individuals can free themselves from financial slavery is a very rewarding experience, both spiritually and financially.

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BankNotes – December 2012

The team of Carlos Lara, Dr. Robert Murphy, David Stearns and I are well on the way to completing an innovative new training program for the financial services industry professional. We will unveil this program at this year’s annual Think Tank Symposium in February.

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BankNotes – November 2012

Divisible Surplus. What is it? Where does it come from? Why is it so relevant in the structure of a mutual life insurance company? Who determines when and how it is to be divided? Even more importantly, how do the insurer, the government regulator, the agent and the policy owner see, or how should they see, its importance from their particular points of view?

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BankNotes – October 2012

Sabina (Bina) West Miller (1867–1954) is proof that one person can change the world. She saw a social injustice and corrected it through hard work, entrepreneurship, and good will. In the process she broke through one of the strongest cultural barriers in history: bias against women.

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