LMR – April 2014

“Oh, he’s nothing more than a human being!” —a young precocious child blurts out as the King parades in procession before his subjects.

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LMR – March 2014

Virtually every social problem today that ostensibly justifies further government intervention into our private affairs, has at its root an economic foundation. Beyond the obvious issues such as the Fed’s “quantitative easing” programs, proposals to raise the minimum wage, and of course ObamaCare, even things like the situation in Ukraine—where cynics suspect energy has more to do with it than political self-determination—require knowledge of economic science.

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LMR – February 2014

As this issue goes to publication, we hear reports of Russian troops crossing into Ukraine. There will no doubt be complaints from the traditional opponents of President Obama that he is “soft” and that the “lessons from history” indicate that decisive U.S. force is urgently required. We are neither historians nor military strategists. But we do understand the historical connection between war and the growth of government. When once the dogs of war are unleashed, it is very difficult to bring them to heel.

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LMR – January 2014

TAXATION IS ROBBERY, by Frank Chodorov. “There it was; simple perhaps, but how many of us, let alone how many professors of the economics of taxation, have ever given utterance to this shattering and demolishing truth? Frank was always like that.” —Murray N. Rothbard
It’s true. Here is a writer that was profoundly honest and just told it like it is.

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LMR – December 2013

Give Me Liberty. We could not think of more appropriate words to convey to our LMR readership than these, especially as we near the end of this year and begin the next. Our sincerest hope is that they will take on a greater meaning for you if you know that they were taken from the title of a short inspirational little book written by Rose Wilder Lane. Who is she?

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LMR – November 2013

“To regain paradigms lost,” is a phrase that appears in the closing sentences of Murray Rothbard’s crowning achievement, The History of Economic Thought Before Adam Smith, written before his death in 1995. In this last paragraph of his last masterpiece he is describing how the development of knowledge in a scienti#c discipline is never a steady climb upwards into the light of wisdom where scientists go and simply pick up amassed understanding and take it to the next insightful level.

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LMR – October 2013

“Two roads diverged in a wood, and I took the one less traveled by…” These are the beginning words of one of the creates sentences ever penned. it is famous because it instantly creates the image of that divide in our minds and places us right in the center of it. But these are not just words; they represent a real-life experience we have all had. Only a small percentage pick the road we have picked. it is so reminiscent of the page of the 10%.

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LMR – September 2013

The total number of casualties in World War I was estimated at 37 million people. World War II deaths totaled approximately 75 million of which 35 million were civilians. These statistics impress upon us how merciless modern war can be. Mises’ insight into the nature of war and its irrationality compels us to think deeply on the matter while at the same time convicts us.

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LMR – August 2013

Not every organization of coercion is called a State. however, the State is that institution which claims a monopoly to decide on the legitimate use of force, and which derives its funding in a nonvoluntary process. (If taxes were truly voluntary, we would have a club, not a State.) Because they perceive its tremendous power, many people align themselves with the State.

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LMR – July 2013

If there is one thing most sound thinking Americans have learned about our government it is that it has proven to do only three things well— wage war, inflate the currency, and tax us unmercifully. At everything else it is a dismal failure.

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